Showing posts with label transmitter. Show all posts
Showing posts with label transmitter. Show all posts

Monday, April 9, 2018

What is a Pressure Transmitter?

Differential pressure transmitter
Differential pressure
transmitter (Yokogawa)
A pressure transmitter is a transducer that converts pressure into an electrical signal it outputs both analog and digital signals corresponding to the pressure. A pressure transmitter measures three phenomena: differential pressure; gauge pressure; and absolute pressure. The most common and useful industrial pressure measuring instrument is a differential pressure transmitter. This instrument senses the difference in pressure between two ports and produces an output signal with reference to a calibrated pressure range.

Industrial Applications of Pressure Transmitters

Pressure transmitters are commonly used to measure the pressure inside of industrial machinery or in industrial processes. They are used in various industries such as oil and gas, refining, chemical, pharmacy, and so on.

Pressure Transmitters in Industry

Pressure Transmitters in Industry
Pressure Transmitters in Industry
Pressure transmitters are widely used in industry to measure flow, level, and pressure. There are unlimited industrial applications. Oil and gas flow metering applications are found onshore, offshore and in subsea. It is also often used for monitoring filters in water and effluent treatment plants, monitoring sprinkler systems, and remote sensing of heating systems for steam or hot water. It can monitor pressure drops across valves and can be used to monitor pump control.

Differential Pressure for Flow Measurement

DP flow measurement is one of the most common applications for differential pressure transmitters by measuring the difference in fluid pressure. While the fluid flows through a pipe, it is possible to calculate the flow rate for differential pressure flow measurement. A primary and the secondary element are used. The primary element is designed to produce a difference in pressure as the flow increases. There are many different types of primary element, the most common being the orifice plate, Venturi flow nozzle, and pitot tube. The secondary element is a differential pressure transmitter. It is designed to measure the differential pressure produced by the primary element as accurately as possible. In particular it is important that the differential pressure measurement is not affected by changes in the fluid line pressure, temperature, or other properties such as ambient temperature. A good DP transmitter will ensure that the differential pressure is measured accurately regardless of other changing parameters and will reliably transmit a signal to represent the differential pressure. The DP flow transmitter output signal may also include square root extraction for flow calculation, although it is common for this function to be handled in a control system. In a typical control loop, the transmitter signal is fed to the controller whose output is used to regulate the flow rate through a control valve.

Differential Pressure for Flow Measurement
Differential Pressure for Flow Measurement


Differential Pressure for Level Measurement

Differential pressure transmitters can also be used for tank levels by measuring the pressure. The transmitter is installed at the bottom of the tank whose level is to be detected. In case of a sealed tank, a transmitter with capillaries measures a differential pressure between the upper side and the bottom side. The liquid inside the tank at the bottom creates pressure which is higher than the pressure at the top. The difference in these pressures can be used to calculate the level. In case of an open tank, the transmitter measures the differential pressure between the liquid inside the tank and the reference atmospheric pressure. In a typical control loop, the transmitter signal is fed to the controller whose output is used to regulate the tight level through a control valve.

Differential Pressure for Level Measurement
Differential Pressure for Level Measurement

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Draeger Gas Detection Transmitter and Feature Selection Charts

Here are two charts to help you select Draeger Gas Detection Transmitters.

The diagram below provides a flow chart on how to properly select a Draeger transmitter.

Draeger Transmitter Selection Flow Chart
Draeger Transmitter Selection Flow Chart (click for larger view).

The table below provides a feature comparison table for most Draeger transmitters (it does not show the PointGard 2100, but the P8100 features are very similar, if not identical).

Draeger transmitter feature comparison table
Draeger transmitter feature comparison table
(click for larger view).

Thursday, August 3, 2017

Pressure Sensor Accessories - Filled Impulse Line

welded isolating diaphragm for pressure sensing line
An isolating diaphragm, such as this variety
pictured, can be used as a barrier between
process fluid and sensing line fill.
Image courtesy REO Temp 
Pressure sensors intended for use in industrial process measurement and control applications are designed to be robust, dependable, and precise. Sometimes, though, it is necessary or beneficial to incorporate accessories in an installation which augment the performance of pressure sensors in difficult or hazardous environments. There are some scenarios where the sensor must be isolated from the process fluid, such as when the substance is highly corrosive or otherwise damaging to the pressure sensor.

A way to aid pressure sensing instruments in situations where direct contact must be avoided is by using a filled impulse line. An impulse line extends from a process pipe of vessel to a pressure measurement instrument or sensor. The line can have a diaphragm barrier that isolates the process fluid from the line, or the line can be open to the process. There are best practices that should be followed in the design and installation of an impulse line to assure that the line provides a useful transmission of the process pressure to the sensor and whatever degree of isolation or protection is needed remains in effect.

The filled impulse line functions via the addition of a non-harmful, neutral fluid to the impulse line. The neutral fluid acts as a barrier and a bridge, allowing the pressure sensing instrument to measure the pressure of the potentially harmful process fluid without direct contact. An example of this technique being employed is adding glycerin as a neutral fluid to an impulse line below a water pipe.

Glycerin's freeze point is lower than waters, meaning glycerin can withstand lower temperatures before freezing. The impulse line connected to the water pipe may freeze in process environments where the weather is exceptionally cold, since the impulse line will not be flowing in the same way as the water pipe. Since glycerin has a greater density and a lower freezing point, the glycerin will remain static inside the impulse line and protect the line from hazardous conditions.
pressure transmitter
Filled impulse lines protect pressure
transmitters from the adverse impact
of aggressive process fluids.


The use of an isolating diaphragm negates the need for certain considerations of fill fluid density, piping layout, and the need to create an arrangement that holds the fill fluid in place within the impulse line. System pressure will be transferred across the diaphragm from the process fluid to the fill fluid, then to the pressure sensor. It is important to utilize fluids and piping arrangements that do not affect the accurate transference of the process pressure. Any impact related to the impulse line assembly must be determined, and appropriate calibration offset applied to the pressure sensor reading.

An essential design element of a filled impulse line without an isolating diaphragm is that the fill fluid must be compatible with the process fluid, meaning there can be no chemical reactivity between the two. Additionally, the two fluids should be incapable of mixing no matter how much of each fluid is involved in the combination. Even with isolating diaphragms employed, fluid harmony should still be considered because a diaphragm could potentially loose its seal. If such a break were to occur, the fluids used in filled impulse lines may contact the process fluid, with an impact that should be clearly understood through a careful evaluation.

Monday, April 10, 2017

Introduction to Transmitters

Process transmitters
Flow transmitter (FCI)
Transmitters are process control field devices. They receive input from a connected process sensor, then convert the sensor signal to an output signal using a transmission protocol. The output signal is passed to a monitoring, control, or decision device for use in documenting, regulating, or monitoring a process or operation.

In general, transmitters accomplish three steps, including converting the initial signal twice.

The first step is the initial conversion which alters the input signal to make it linear. After an amplification of the converted signal, the second conversion changes the signal into either a standard electrical or pneumatic output signal that can be utilized by receiving instruments and devices. The third and final step is the actual output of the electrical or pneumatic signal to utilization equipment  controllers, PLC, recorder, etc.

Transmitters are available for almost every measured parameter in process control, and often referred to according to the process condition which they measure. Some examples.
  • Pressure transmitters
  • Temperature transmitters
  • Flow transmitters
  • Level transmitters
  • Vibration transmitters
  • Current, voltage & power transmitters
  • PH, conductivity, dissolved gas transmitters, etc. 
Pressure transmitter
Pressure transmitter
(Yokogawa)
Output signals for transmitters, when electrical, often are either voltage (1-5 or 2-10 volts DC) or current (4-20 mA). Power requirements can vary among products, but are often 110/220 VAC or 24 VDC.  Low power consumption by electrical transmitters can permit some units to be loop powered, operating from the voltage applied to the output current loop. These devices are also called two-wire transmitters because only two conductors are connected to the unit. Unlike the two wire system which only needs two wires to power the transmitter and analog signal output, the four-wire system requires four separate conductors, with one pair serving as the power supply to the unit and a separate pair providing the output signal path. Pneumatic transmitters, while still in use, are continuously being supplanted by electrical units that provide adequate levels of safety and functionality in environments previously only served by pneumatic units.

Many transmitters are provided with higher order functions in addition to merely converting an input signal to an output signal. On board displays, keypads, Bluetooth connectivity, and a host of industry standard communication protocols can also be had as an integral part of many process transmitters. Other functions that provide alarm or safety action are more frequently part of the transmitter package, as well.

Wireless transmitters are also available, with some operating from battery power and negating the need for any wired connection at all. Process transmitters have evolved from simple signal conversion devices to higher functioning, efficient, easy to apply and maintain instruments utilized for providing input to process control systems.