Showing posts with label clamp-on flow meters. Show all posts
Showing posts with label clamp-on flow meters. Show all posts

Saturday, November 11, 2017

Clamp-on, Transit-time Difference Ultrasonic Flowmeters Ideal for HVAC Retrofit and New Construction

Transit-time Difference Ultrasonic Flowmeters
Transit-time Difference Ultrasonic Flowmeters (Flexim)
There are many reasons for large commercial buildings, medical centers, museums, airports, sports complexes, federal institutions and military complexes to invest in building energy optimization efforts. Better and more efficient operation of HVAC equipment can reduce the buildings energy and operational costs significantly.

Controlling flow, temperature and pumps can provide energy cost savings of over 20%. Many campus energy managers believe that the biggest user of energy in any complex is the HVAC system, and the key to saving energy in HVAC systems is an accurate and reliable flow metering capability.

Better efficiency of the heating and cooling infrastructure of a building also leads to more environmentally friendly buildings, something that has become a social prerogative of building owners and operators.  Older buildings were not built with BTU meters as metering requirements were added to buildings through increased regulations.

Submetering the buildings heating and cooling systems have become increasingly more important, as building owners are both mandated to meter these utilities and have a financial interest in the accuracy of these BTU measurements. The problem historically is that nearly all flow meters are designed for gradual failure due to direct contact with the fluids they are monitoring and the particulate accumulation on the sensors.

Clamp-on, transit-time difference ultrasonic flowmeters are the ideal retro-fit flowmeter, and also should receive strong consideration for new building construction. Transit-time difference ultrasonic clamp on flowmeters exploit the fact that the transmission speed of an ultrasonic signal depends on the flow velocity of the carrier medium - kind of like a swimmer swimming against the current. The signal moves slower against the flow than with it.

How Transit-time Difference Ultrasonic Flowmeters Work

The flowmeter sends ultrasonic pulses through the process medium - one in the same direction as the
flow and one in the opposite direction. The flowmeter's transducers alternate as emitters and receivers. The transit time of the signal going with the flow is shorter than the one going against. The flowmeter measures transit-time difference and determines the average flow velocity of the process medium. Since ultrasonic signals propagate in solids, the flowmeter can be conveniently mounted directly on the pipe and measure flow non-invasively.

Contact Flow-Tech with your questions about any flow measurement application. Reach them at 410-666-3200, or visit http://www.flowtechonline.com.

Sunday, April 30, 2017

Understanding Ultrasonic Flow Measurement

externally mounted flow meters
Externally mounted (clamp-on) flow meters (Flexim)
Ultrasonic flow meters measure, via sound waves inaudible to humans, the velocity of fluid flowing through a conduit. The conduit can be a recognizable closed piping run, or open channels, flumes, or chutes. The technology is predominantly applied to liquids and gases.

There are three types of ultrasonic flow meters, differentiated by their means of measurement. An open channel flow meter derives liquid depth by computing geometrical distance, combining it with a velocity measurement and known dimensional properties of a flume or other channel. A Doppler shift flow meter reflects ultrasonic energy off sonically reflective materials and measures the frequency shift between emission and reflection to derive a fluid velocity measurement. The contrapropogating transit-time flow meter, more recognizably, the transmission flow meter. The transmission flow meter has two versions: the in-line and the clamp-on. The in-line configuration is intrusive, with flow meter hardware extending into and exposed to the measured media. A clamp-on style ultrasonic flow meter resides on the outside of the pipe, emitting and receiving the ultrasonic pulses through the pipe wall. These process measurement tools, using ultrasound technology, have the ability to measure fluid velocity and calculate volumetric, mass, and totalized flow. The use of ultrasonic flow measurement is prevalent in the oil and gas, nuclear, wastewater, pharmaceutical, and food and beverage industries. It is also employed in energy management systems as a means to measure energy demand.

ultrasonic flowmeterFor intrusive flow meters, sensors are fitted opposite one another and alternate bouncing ultrasonic signals back and forth in the pipe, in an almost tennis-like format. In an elementary explanation, by increasing the number of sensors, engineers are able to decipher flow proportions through calculations of velocity between sensory transmissions; thereby, the flow volume can be computed.

For externally mounted flow meters, a clamp-on device affixes the flow meter measurement elements to the pipe. One special characteristic of clamp-on flow meters is the ability to transmit ultrasonic signals through piping up to four meters in diameter, making them suitable for application in very large systems such as those found in hydroelectric or wastewater installations. The clamp-on arrangement also facilitates addition of a flow measurement point to an existing system without process interruption.

The technology is pervasive in the processing industries, having its particular niche of applications where it excels. Proper installation is a key element in producing reliable and consistent results. Ultrasonic energy flow technology is used for custody transfer of natural gases and petroleum liquids. Custody transfer usually entails following industry, national, and government standards and regulations. Other popular applications include compressed air system monitoring and energy usage metering.

Ultrasonic flow meters, with no moving parts, are comparatively low maintenance and self-diagnosing. Temperature and pressure measurements are needed to calculate mass flow of gases. When measuring liquid mass flow in pipes, it is generally necessary for the pipe cross section to be media filled in order to obtain reliable results.

Whatever your flow measurement challenge, share it with a process measurement specialist. Combine your process knowledge with their product application expertise to develop effective solutions.