Showing posts with label calibration. Show all posts
Showing posts with label calibration. Show all posts

Sunday, August 19, 2018

A Shift for Process Instrumentation: Solving Process Control Problems with Cloud-Based Solutions - Part 1

This two-part article delves into the recent trends in the use of cloud-based tools to help engineers improve their application validation, improve their diagnostic selection of instrumentation, and improve device commissioning.

In the industrial sector, capable engineers are retiring from the workforce and manufacturing companies are being forced to accomplish their work with fewer experienced employees. At the same time, as always, there continues to be the need to reduce maintenance costs and operating costs. Companies are looking for new answers and solutions to optimize project results – to track performance, monitoring, and reliability of process instrumentation.

Cloud-based application and validation tools are currently assisting in:
  • Confirming the correct technology fit.
  • Configuring the correct device so the manufacturer can deliver a pre-engineered and ready for installation product. 
Engineers and other factory personnel can input data via a smart phone, or a laptop computer so they can have their specific requirements recorded. In addition, collaboration with other team members is possible, through the cloud, to determine the optimum set up for the project devices to streamline engineering decisions (and to avoid expensive mistakes upfront in the project). Information in the cloud may also be equipped for instant duplication, so projects that have many identical device configurations can be rapidly repeated.

Using a cloud-based approach improves success in installing large numbers of new field instruments, which is common for unit expansion. Other benefits of adapting cloud-based services for prices control include:
  • A convenient way to share and collaborate in real-time. Multiple users can visualize the transmitter configuration though a link. This saves staff time and reduces travel time for support people. 
  • If a beginning user has an underdeveloped knowledge of the application, the cloud can provide readily accessible information such as compatibility charts, specification sheets, code requirements, etc … . 
  • Generation of a standard data sheet so engineers don't have to spend as much time on data entry. The data sheet can be stored to support the user's necessary documentation and audit trail. 
The paradigm for instrumentation setup is changing dramatically. Cloud-based solutions and engineering tools are helping to optimize manufacturing operations and carry out capital projects as cost effectively, efficiently, and as rapidly as possible.

https://flowtechonline.com
410-666-3200 in MD
804-752-3450 in VA

Friday, March 30, 2018

Flow-Tech, Inc. - Process Instrumentation, Calibration, Safety, Measurement and Control

Flow-Tech is a manufacturer’s representative and stocking distributor of process instrumentation and calibration equipment in Maryland, D.C and Virginia specializing in the Industrial Process, Control, and Test / Measurement markets. Customers include: Power and Chemical plants, OEM’s, System Integrators, Municipalities, Engineering Firms, Universities, Medical Centers, and Research / Metrology Labs. Products and systems focus on the measurement and control of: flow, pressure, temperature, and level; as well as calibration equipment, analyzers, gas detection, annunciators, and data acquisition. Flow-Tech also provides field service, turn-key systems, equipment start-up, service contracts, and training.


Monday, November 20, 2017

Understanding Mass Flow Controller (MFC) Metrology & Calibration

Mass flow controllers (MFCs) precisely deliver fluids, mainly process gases, into bioreactors and other process systems. The stable, reliable and repeatable delivery of these gases is a function of four key factors:
  • The quality and sophistication of the MFC’s design.
  • The application set-up, which covers the acceptable level of  fluid delivery accuracy a given process requires.
  • Metrology: what specific techniques are used to test, measure and con rm MFC accuracy.
  • Calibration checks: how an MFC is calibrated on an ongoing basis.
It’s common to extensively investigate an MFC’s technical characteristics and capabilities, as well as analyze and ensure that the MFC technology chosen fully satis es each operation’s unique process requirements. Equally important is the role that metrology, which includes testing reference standards and calibration practices, plays in the performance and long-term value of biopharmaceutical process equipment MFCs. In the eBook below, we will provide a deeper understanding of metrology’s role in how MFCs are used and managed in these systems. This includes:
  • The key elements of MFC accuracy and why calibration is important
  • How MFC calibration reference standards are used and why selecting the right standard matters
  • The role that “uncertainty” plays in calibrating MFCs
  • Factors that can lead to improper calibration
Please review the eBook embedded in this post below, or if you prefer, you can download your own PDF copy here - Understanding Mass Flow Controller (MFC) Metrology & Calibration. For more information about MFC's, contact Flow-Tech at https://www.flowtechonline.com or call 410-666-3200.

Thursday, August 31, 2017

Process Instrument Calibration

Meriam MFC5150 HART Communicator
Meriam MFC5150
HART Communicator
Calibration is an essential part of keeping process measurement instrumentation delivering reliable and actionable information. All instruments utilized in process control are dependent on variables which translate from input to output. Calibration ensures the instrument is properly detecting and processing the input so that the output accurately represents a process condition. Typically, calibration involves the technician simulating an environmental condition and applying it to the measurement instrument. An input with a known quantity is introduced to the instrument, at which point the technician observes how the instrument responds, comparing instrument output to the known input signal.

Even if instruments are designed to withstand harsh physical conditions and last for long periods of time, routine calibration as defined by manufacturer, industry, and operator standards is necessary to periodically validate measurement performance. Information provided by measurement instruments is used for process control and decision making, so a difference between an instrument's output signal and the actual process condition can impact process output or facility overall performance and safety.

In all cases, the operation of a measurement instrument should be referenced, or traceable, to a
universally recognized and verified measurement standard. Maintaining the reference path between a field instrument and a recognized physical standard requires careful attention to detail and uncompromising adherence to procedure.

Calibration gauges
Calibration gauges (Permacal)
Instrument ranging is where a certain range of simulated input conditions are applied to an instrument and verifying that the relationship between input and output stays within a specified tolerance across the entire range of input values. Calibration and ranging differ in that calibration focuses more on whether or not the instrument is sensing the input variable accurately, whereas ranging focuses more on the instrument's input and output. The difference is important to note because re-ranging and re-calibration are distinct procedures.

In order to calibrate an instrument correctly, a reference point is necessary. In some cases, the reference point can be produced by a portable instrument, allowing in-place calibration of a transmitter or sensor. In other cases, precisely manufactured or engineered standards exist that can be used for bench calibration. Documentation of each operation, verifying that proper procedure was followed and calibration values recorded, should be maintained on file for inspection.

As measurement instruments age, they are more susceptible to declination in stability. Any time maintenance is performed, calibration should be a required step since the calibration parameters are sourced from pre-set calibration data which allows for all the instruments in a system to function as a process control unit.

Typical calibration timetables vary depending on specifics related to equipment and use. Generally, calibration is performed at predetermined time intervals, with notable changes in instrument performance also being a reliable indicator for when an instrument may need a tune-up. A typical type of recalibration regarding the use of analog and smart instruments is the zero and span adjustment, where the zero and span values define the instrument's specific range. Accuracy at specific input value points may also be included, if deemed significant.

The management of calibration and maintenance operations for process measurement instrumentation is a significant factor in facility and process operation. It can be performed with properly trained and equipped in-house personnel, or with the engagement of subcontractors. Calibration operations can be a significant cost center, with benefits accruing from increases in efficiency gained through the use of better calibration instrumentation that reduces task time.

Contact Flow-Tech at 410-666-3200 in Maryland and 804-752-3450 in Virginia for any calibration question or requirement.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Thursday, December 22, 2016

Multifunction Calibrator Keeps Process Instruments "In Tune"

Genii 620 multifunction calibrator shown on pressure station
GE Multifunction Calibrator
Shown with pressure calibrator accessory
Courtesy GE Measurement & Control
Industrial process operations are populated with sensors, transmitters, and other measuring instruments of many varieties. This instrumentation is not installed without good reason, with each data point providing valuable and necessary information with regard to process status and safety. Regular maintenance and calibration of measurement instrumentation is a necessary part of maintaining quality, efficiency, and safety.

With so many different types and manufacturers of instruments, purchasing and maintaining calibration equipment can become and unwieldy process in itself. GE Measurement & Control meets the challenge by incorporating numerous calibration capabilities into a single high accuracy unit with flexibility and ease of use. The unit can simultaneously source and measure an extensive array of signals, providing capability to use a single calibrator for a long, maybe even complete, list of instruments installed at your site. Utilization of the multifunction calibrator can potentially reduce the total number of instruments in your calibration shop, with a commensurate reduction in cost, documentation, and time commitment to keep your calibration instrument arsenal ready for use.

A datasheet with all the details is included below. Browse the data sheet and reach out to a specialist with your calibration requirements and challenges. Work together to develop an effective solution for your operation.