Showing posts with label V-Cone. Show all posts
Showing posts with label V-Cone. Show all posts

Friday, February 16, 2018

Campus Metering: Advantages of Using V-Cone for Measuring Chilled Water & Steam in Hospitals, Universities, and Institutions

McCrometer's V-Cone
Typical diagram of V-Cone installation.
(Click for larger view).
McCrometer's V-Cone® Flow Meter is an advanced differential pressure instrument, which is ideal for use with liquid, steam or gas media in rugged conditions where accuracy, low maintenance and cost are important. The V-Cone is especially useful in tight-fit and retrofit installations. 

In most instances the use of V-Cones associated with chillers for chilled water in large institutional users is a matter of space, accuracy, and turndown. The V-Cone needs very little upstream and downstream piping requirements, allowing it to be used in spaces where other meters cannot be used, or to replace existing flowmeters that never proved accurate because of space limitations. 

In many large universities and other facilities, such as hospitals and airports, across the U.S., the reason for initial interest and subsequent purchases of V-Cones to measure Chilled Water was to fit within the confines of the existing and new buildings that were being used to house the chillers. Additionally, the second most important reason was the delivered accuracy. In the past, most usage had been ignored, but with the rising costs associated with cooling, each individual building must be accountable for individual use. This is just good fiscal responsibility and management from an energy balance standpoint. Turndown was an issue because of seasonal swings in usage based on climate and population in the buildings at any particular time. Therefore, the meters needed to be able to have a large flow span (turndown), which remained accurate during continuous use.
McCrometer's V-Cone
Internal view of V-Cone.

V-Cones have recently been selected for Steam service for mostly the same reasons as they are selected for Chilled Water. Space limitations in new and/or older buildings are a serious concern. V-Cones have the smallest piping requirements of practically any flowmeter and continue to deliver accurate measurement, so they are fiscally responsible and cost effective. Additionally, in steam, they allow condensate and/or other small particulate matter to pass without affecting the measurement, thus giving much better accuracy instantaneously and over time. 

They are very rugged flowmeters which require little or no maintenance, and have a very long expected life even in “tough” service like steam. They can be designed with great turndown (span) and therefore can accommodate changes in flowrates based on demand, seasonal or from other factors.

For more information on V-Cone flowmeters, contact Flow-Tech in Maryland at 410-666-3200, in Virginia at 804-752-3450, or by visiting https://flowtechonline.com.

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Understanding the V-Cone Flow Meter

VM V-Cone System
VM V-Cone System by McCrometer
The VM V-Cone System, manufactured by McCrometer, acts as its own flow conditioner, fully conditioning and mixing the flow prior to measurement.

The key benefit to the VM V-Cone flow meter’s unique design is its ability to provide reliable system accuracy of +0.5% of rate over a 10:1 flow range under the most difficult flow conditions. Readings are precise and reliable, even under changing flow conditions and start/stop flows.

Once installed, the primary element rarely, if ever, needs to be removed from service. This leaves only the flow transmitter with the occasional recalibration over its lifetime. The V-Cone family of flow meters have a proven long life with installations exceeding 20 years without the need to be removed or re-calibrated.

The VM V-Cone flow meter’s enhanced performance is due to the shape and positioning of the measuring element. The VM V-Cone flow meter’s unique design centers the differential pressure cone centrally in the flow tube. This placement reshapes the flow profile, giving the V-Cone the smallest footprint of any in-line flow meter. This conditioned flow creates a low amplitude, high frequency signal that is accurate to ±0.5% of rate.

This video visually demonstrates the advantages of the V-Cone flow meter.


For more information, contact:
Flow-Tech
10940 Beaver Dam Rd.
Hunt Valley, MD 21030
Ph: 410-666-3200

Thursday, January 28, 2016

Advanced Differential Pressure Flowmeter Technology

McCrometer V-Cone
McCrometer V-Cone
The McCrometer V-Cone® flowmeter accurately measures flow over a wide range of Reynolds numbers, under all kinds of conditions and for a variety of fluids. It operates on the same physical principle as other differential pressure-type flowmeters, using the theorem of conservation of energy in fluid flow through a pipe.

The V-Cone’s remarkable performance characteristics, however, are the result of its unique design. It features a centrally-located cone inside the tube. The cone interacts with the fluid flow, reshaping the fluid’s velocity profile and creating a region of lower pressure immediately downstream of itself. The pressure difference, exhibited between the static line pressure and the low pressure created downstream of the cone, can be measured via two pressure sensing taps. One tap is placed slightly upstream of the cone, the other is located in the downstream face of the cone itself. The pressure difference can then be incorporated into a derivation of the Bernoulli equation to determine the fluid flow rate. The cone’s central position in the line optimizes the velocity profile of the  ow at the point of measurement, assuring highly accurate, reliable  ow measurement regardless of the condition of the  ow upstream of the meter.

The V-Cone is a differential pressure type flowmeter. Basic theories behind differential pressure type flowmeters have existed for over a century. The principal theory among these is Bernoulli’s theorem for the conservation of energy in a closed pipe. This states that for a constant  ow, the pressure in a pipe is inversely proportional to the square of the velocity in the pipe.

Simply, the pressure decreases as the velocity increases. For instance, as the fluid approaches the V-Cone meter, it will have a pressure of P1. As the fluid velocity increases at the constricted area of the V-Cone, the pressure drops to P2. Both P1 and P2 are measured at the V-Cone’s taps using a variety of differential pressure transducers. The Dp created by a V-Cone will increase and decrease exponentially with the flow velocity. As the constriction takes up more of the pipe cross-sectional area, more differential pressure will be created at the same flowrates.