Showing posts with label Maryland. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Maryland. Show all posts

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Brooks Instrument

Brooks Instrument is the global leader in flow and pressure instrumentation, enabling precision process control for industrial and semiconductor applications.

Products include:
  • Mass Flow Controllers & Meters
  • Variable Area Flow Meters (Rotameters)
  • Pressure & Vacuum Products
  • Vaporization Products
  • Semiconductor Products

Represented in Maryland and Virginia by Flow-Tech, Inc.
https://flowtechonline.com
410-666-3200 MD
840-752-3450 VA

Sunday, August 19, 2018

A Shift for Process Instrumentation: Solving Process Control Problems with Cloud-Based Solutions - Part 1

This two-part article delves into the recent trends in the use of cloud-based tools to help engineers improve their application validation, improve their diagnostic selection of instrumentation, and improve device commissioning.

In the industrial sector, capable engineers are retiring from the workforce and manufacturing companies are being forced to accomplish their work with fewer experienced employees. At the same time, as always, there continues to be the need to reduce maintenance costs and operating costs. Companies are looking for new answers and solutions to optimize project results – to track performance, monitoring, and reliability of process instrumentation.

Cloud-based application and validation tools are currently assisting in:
  • Confirming the correct technology fit.
  • Configuring the correct device so the manufacturer can deliver a pre-engineered and ready for installation product. 
Engineers and other factory personnel can input data via a smart phone, or a laptop computer so they can have their specific requirements recorded. In addition, collaboration with other team members is possible, through the cloud, to determine the optimum set up for the project devices to streamline engineering decisions (and to avoid expensive mistakes upfront in the project). Information in the cloud may also be equipped for instant duplication, so projects that have many identical device configurations can be rapidly repeated.

Using a cloud-based approach improves success in installing large numbers of new field instruments, which is common for unit expansion. Other benefits of adapting cloud-based services for prices control include:
  • A convenient way to share and collaborate in real-time. Multiple users can visualize the transmitter configuration though a link. This saves staff time and reduces travel time for support people. 
  • If a beginning user has an underdeveloped knowledge of the application, the cloud can provide readily accessible information such as compatibility charts, specification sheets, code requirements, etc … . 
  • Generation of a standard data sheet so engineers don't have to spend as much time on data entry. The data sheet can be stored to support the user's necessary documentation and audit trail. 
The paradigm for instrumentation setup is changing dramatically. Cloud-based solutions and engineering tools are helping to optimize manufacturing operations and carry out capital projects as cost effectively, efficiently, and as rapidly as possible.

https://flowtechonline.com
410-666-3200 in MD
804-752-3450 in VA

Friday, August 10, 2018

Understanding Fluids: Viscosity, Viscosity Index, and Compressibility

Viscosity
In order to understand process flow control it is critical to understand the basic properties of fluids.  This article provides the reader with a fundamental understanding of viscosity, viscosity index, compressibility, and the advantages of petroleum based hydraulic fluids.

Fluids used in mechanical systems come in many different types. The type of fluid chosen for a
particular application depends on its characteristics. One of the most important characteristics of a fluid is its viscosity. Viscosity is defined as a fluids resistance to flow. Fluids with low viscosity flow very easily. Water is a type of fluid with low viscosity. Fluids with high viscosity are more resistant to flow. Honey is a type of fluid with a high viscosity, therefore honey is more viscous than water.

Viscosity Index
Viscosity index relates to the change
in viscosity to a change in temperature.
Another characteristic of fluids is the viscosity index. This rating relates the flow of a fluid with its temperature. Many fluids begin to flow more easily as temperature increases. The viscosity index is the measurement of this characteristic. A high viscosity index indicates a small viscosity change with temperature. A low viscosity index indicates a large viscosity change with temperature.

Compressibility is another characteristic of fluids. It measures the change in volume of a fluid as a response to a change in pressure. Fluids such as gases are highly compressible. Their volumes change significantly when placed under pressure. Liquid fluids also have a compressibility factor. Water and petroleum based hydraulic fluid are almost completely incompressible. They don't compress when put under pressure. This characteristic is what allows them to be used to transmit power in fluid systems.
Compressibility gases
Gases are highly
compressible.

Years ago, water was used as the first hydraulic fluid because there was no other liquid available in such large quantities at such a low cost. There are some major draw backs to using water as a working fluid. Due to its low viscosity, it is difficult to pump. Additionally, the speed at which it flows through the system causes an effect known as wire drawing. Wire drawing occurs when the water flow erodes, or scores, a pathway in the metal of machinery as it goes around corners and through orifices. It also has corrosive effects on metal machinery.

Over time petroleum based hydraulic fluids have become much more cost-effective. For starters, it has a lower specific gravity than any other liquid and can be pumped with less power loss. It also lubricates as it works through the system and has little corrosive effects on metal machinery. Flammability is an issue, but with the development of synthetic oils, alternatives to water remain the
Compressibility liquids
Water and hydraulic fluids
are almost completely
incompressible.
preferred working fluid.

Several factors should be considered when designing a fluid system that uses a petroleum-based hydraulic fluid. The first is cleanliness. Oil never wears outbut it can become so contaminated that it is unfit for further use. Fluid systems frequently employ filters throughout the system to help reduce contaminants. They may also require complete fluid replacement after certain time intervals and this can become cost prohibitive with larger systems. Another factor common to hydraulic fluids are the use of additives. Additives can be used to reduce aeration and the production of bubbles as the fluid travels rapidly throughout the system. They can be used to administer corrosion inhibitors within the reservoir and they can be used as a multi-agent which helps the fluid resist mixing with water.

The choice of modern fluids is so wide that when designing a new system fluid characteristics such as viscosity, viscosity index, cleanliness, filtration and additives should be considered as early as possible in the design process.

Always consult with a process flow expert before selecting materials and equipment in any process control loop. Their experience and knowledge will help you design an efficient, safe, and cost-effective solution.







Information courtesy of www.eicc.edu and funded through a Department of Labor grant under creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

How to Connect the Brooks Instrument MT3809 Variable Area Flow Meter (Rotameter) with FOUNDATION™ Fieldbus Transmitter to Your Network

Brooks Instrument MT3809 Variable Area Flow Meter
MT3809 Variable Area Flow Meter
Brooks Instrument has added a new FOUNDATION™ Fieldbus transmitter to its popular MT3809 variable area (VA) flow meter, making it easier for users to integrate the unit into their automation control systems for more efficient data capture and digital communication across the plant enterprise. The MT3809 is also EMERSON™ qualified for its Delta V control system and AMS device manager.

The FOUNDATION Fieldbus transmitter is a compact microprocessor device that interfaces directly with the MT3809 flow meter. A single 2-wire bus connection compliant with the international FOUNDATION Fieldbus standard provides power to the transmitter and communications access. The flow meter itself does not require power.

The new transmitter makes it easier to access multiple MT3809 VA flow meter variables, including:
  • Flow rates
  • Totalization, both resettable and inventory measurement
  • Temperatures
  • Densities
  • Calibration factors
  • Hi-low alarm parameters, which enable facilities and systems operators to be notified if gas or fluid flow rates fall outside set values
In addition, the MT3809 VA flow meter has a local operator interface with LCD display for insight into flow status and fluid measurement. These outputs are configurable and can be shown in various engineering units. Operators can also change parameters without removing the housing cover, enabling changes to be made in hazardous areas.

The FOUNDATION Fieldbus transmitter on the Brooks Instrument MT3809 VA flow meter is equipped with the most up-to-date version of the FOUNDATION Fieldbus protocol, ITK 6.0. The transmitter and alarm options have worldwide safety approvals as well as SIL 2 safety certification.

https://flowtechonline.com
410-666-3200 in MD
804-752-3450 in VA

Thursday, June 21, 2018

How Thermal Energy Meters Reduce Costs at University Campuses

Installation under 4 hrs.
Step 1: Cut insulation where
transducers and
RTD will be located.
The cooling and heating of a university campus is one of the primary areas where better energy management, including improved efficiency and energy reduction, brings some of the highest returns.

Every university to some extent is now engaged in this process, and one of the first things that has to be addressed is the metering of distributed thermal energy. To effectively begin energy reduction initiatives, accurate and reliable thermal energy metering has to be in place.

Today, there is high priority for understanding that we need to be better stewards of energy consumption. Poor energy consumption harms the environment and creates much higher operating costs. Universities have become very involved in the move toward greener energy. Many universities began metering long ago while some are just beginning. Most are in the middle of the process.

Step 2: Install stainless bands around
pipe under insulation.
There are many different types of meters, and often, many of these choices turn out to be unreliable. In order to achieve real accountability for energy usage at campus buildings, energy managers at leading universities are applying a “utility model.” In the utility model, building managers responsible for campus buildings are billed at utility grade costs for the thermal energy consumed. This creates an environment where focus falls to thermal energy conservation. It’s also vital that inefficiencies are identified and corrected through metering.

You can’t manage what you don’t measure!

Many universities have gone through an evolution of trying to meter thermal energy consumption throughout their campus. The success of these ventures can be elusive when the meter chosen for the job doesn’t live up to expectations. Examples include insertion meters that over time will foul and meters that cannot respond to low velocities that are prevalent during off-peak metering.

Step 3: Install
transducers and RTD.
On proven alternative is FLEXIM’s Thermal Energy / BTU Flow Meter. The technology, based upon FLEXIM's ultrasonic clamp-on meters, do not require shutdown and are very cost effective to install.

Clamp-on ultrasonic meters have been doing the job of BTU-metering for decades and the Flexim thermal energy meters are leading the effort towards more energy efficient buildings and facilities.

Step 4: Cover transducers and RTD
with insulation and tape.
More than 150 colleges and universities throughout the country are using the FLEXIM product as their preferred thermal energy meter and attest to FLEXIM’s performance, reliability and support.


For more information on Flexim thermal energy products, contact Flow-Tech by visiting https://flowtechonline.com or by calling 410-666-3200 in Maryland or 804-752-3450 in Virginia.


Saturday, June 9, 2018

Maryland, Washington D.C., and Virginia's Premier Process, Control, Test & Measurement Representative

Process, Control, Test & Measurement Representative

Flow-Tech, Inc.

Providing applications expertise and engineering support for Power and Chemical plants, OEM’s,
System Integrators, Municipalities, Engineering Firms, Universities, Medical Centers, and Research / Metrology Labs.

Specializing in:

Process Instrumentation

Flow, Data Acquisition & Control Instruments, Gas Detection, Analyzers, Level Control & Measurement, Pressure & Temperature Indicators and Transmitters, Vibration - Asset Condition Monitoring , Indicators & Energy Flow Computers

Pressure Relief, Tank Blanketing and Flame Arrest

Rupture Discs, Tank Conservation Vents, Explosion Venting, Tank Blanketing, Flame Arrestors

Gas Detection

Personal Gas Detection - Portables and Drager Tubes, Hazardous Gas Area Monitor, Respiratory Protection

Control Valves, On-Off Valves and Regulators

Gas, Steam & Liquid Control Valves, Pressure Reducing & Back Pressure Regulators, Sanitary Regulators and Control Valves, On-Off Valves

Explosion Protection Testing, Isolation Valves, Vents and Systems

Active Explosion Suppression Systems, Explosion Isolation Valves, Explosion Venting, Explosion Testing Services

ABB Low & Medium Voltage VFD Drives

ABB General Purpose Drives, ABB Industrial AC Drives, ABB Industry Specific Drives

Environmental Instruments

Flow, Gas Detection, Analyzers, Pressure & Temperature Indicators and Transmitters, Indicators, Mosaic Displays and Annunciators, Paperless Recorders & Data Acquisition

Friday, May 18, 2018

Wireless Instrumentation Promises to Improve Plant Efficiency, Mitigate Risk, and Increase Productivity

Yokogawa Wireless pressure transmitter
Wireless pressure
transmitter (Yokogawa)
Industrial companies are under great pressure to improve safety, reliability, and efficiency. Plant managers are faced with maintaining profits in face of greater competition and rising costs. Lost production, escalating energy costs, unexpected maintenance problems, and heightened safety concerns are always on the horizon. Situations such as unplanned shutdowns and outages due to equipment failure can be devastating to plant performance. Keeping personnel safe in dangerous or hazardous areas requires strict and deliberate attention to procedure. To address these concerns (reduce risk, save money, improve performance) higher reliability, and feature rich process technologies must continually evolve. Wireless instrumentation is one such technology. These new products deliver a promise to improve plant efficiency, mitigate risk, and increase productivity.

Yokogawa wireless gateway
Wireless gateway
(Yokogawa)
Today's wireless instruments are available for monitoring virtually any process control variable including flow, pressure, level, temperature, pH, Dissolved Oxygen, etc..., or to monitor atmospheres for unsafe levels of toxic or combustible gases. These devices reliably transmit critical control and safety data back to central monitoring systems without the need for human supervision.

The argument for wireless instrumentation is very compelling when you consider installation convenience and cost savings.  Some cost savings estimates run as high as 70%  by eliminating wires and cables, as opposed to the cost when using cables for the same application. And most remarkably, wireless instruments provide additional safety and compliance benefits by keeping maintenance personnel out of dangerous or hazardous areas.

Wireless, portable gas detection
Wireless, portable gas detection
(Drager X-zone 5500)
In the process control industry, there are many reasons to adopt wireless instrumentation, but the acceptance by companies has been slow.  Why is this?  The fiscal argument for the industry to adopt wireless instrumentation networks is convincing as wireless is one of the more promising cost cutting technologies.

Impediments to Wireless
  • Reliability and Familiarity - Wireless must provide the same reliability (real and perceived) as traditional wired units, and engineers, operators, and maintenance staff must become just as comfortable with wireless as they are with wires and cables.
  • Working Within the Existing Infrastructure - Sometimes it doesn't make sense to build or relocate infrastructure or equipment just to create a reliable wireless link.  
  • Integration with Existing Communications - Concern over the impact on engineers, operators, and maintenance because of their work with the other, existing, field communications systems.

Drager wireless gateway
Drager wireless gateway
Industries will always be faced with cost cutting. A plant manager's job is continuous process improvement. There is always a need for better control solutions, and wireless instruments are promising. As the adoption of wireless instrumentation accelerate, concerns about reliability, user comfort,  infrastructure, and integration will subside. Industry-wide acceptance will be driven by deployment and maintenance savings, improved safety and easier governmental compliance.

Friday, May 4, 2018

7 Ways Thermal Mass Flow Meters Can Help Cut Wastewater Treatment Aeration Energy Costs

FCI Thermal Mass Flow Meter
One of the biggest expenses in wastewater treatment operations is the cost of energy to run the blowers and compressors that produce air for the aeration basins. The figures most often cited are that 40 to 50 percent of a wastewater plant’s total energy usage can be attributed to the aeration process.


By measuring the system’s air flows with accurate, repeatable air flow meters, the aeration process can be better controlled to optimize the process and minimize plant energy cost. Three flow sensor technologies typically have been used in aeration air flow monitoring applications in wastewater treatment plants:

Within wastewater treatment plant aeration systems, it is now generally accepted that thermal dispersion mass flow meters are the preferred, proven best solution and have the largest installed base. For plant expansions, new plants and upgrades this trend is expected to continue. The embedded document below presents seven tips that explain how thermal mass flow meters can reduce aeration plant energy costs and have become the flow meter of choice for aeration applications.

Alternatively, you can download your own copy of "7 Tips to Cut Wastewater Aeration Energy Costs with Thermal Mass Flowmeters" here.

Saturday, April 28, 2018

Flameless Explosion Venting

Explosion test
Explosion test without flameless vent.
(Courtesy of Fike)
In the event of a plant explosion, the flames and dust exiting the process vessel threaten a plants personnel, equipment and property. In a normal venting situation, an explosion is freely discharged, with threatening dusts and flames exiting the process vessel. The dust and flame are then channeled down vent ducts and ultimately outside the building. The ductwork has disadvantages though, and indoor plant installations cannot be protected by explosion vents alone.

Flameless venting is highly suited for indoor applications and, used in in combination with explosion vents, can extinguish the flame from the vented explosion without the use of expensive ducting, limitations to equipment location, or more costly explosion protection.  Flameless explosion venting protects people and equipment from flames and dust by using a flame absorber with a mesh filter to rapidly and efficiently cool and extinguish the flames immediately.
Explosion test
Explosion test with flameless vent.
(Courtesy of Fike)

Flameless venting is a viable alternative to ducting.  Since indoor venting is not permitted, the designer has to select between vent ducting and flameless venting, and sometimes flameless explosion venting is the only alternative.

Advantage of Flameless Venting:
  • Eliminates need for expensive ducts
  • Enhanced venting efficiency over venting with ductwork
  • Virtually maintenance free
Explosion venting system designers must take design standards into consideration in order to ensure that the calculated relief area and selected venting devices are compliant with local codes and laws.

Flameless venting must consider venting efficiency and incorporate it in the overall design. The venting efficiency factors of the venting and flameless venting devices are manufacturer product specific, can be application specific and should be used in accordance with the manufacturers’ recommendations only.

It is also critical to discuss your explosion venting application with an applications expert. Gaining their  knowledge and experience can literally mean the difference between success and disaster.

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Flow-Tech, Inc. Serving Maryland, Washington D.C. and Virginia

Flow-Tech is a manufacturer’s representative and stocking distributor of process instrumentation and calibration equipment in Maryland, D.C and Virginia specializing in the Industrial Process, Control, and Test / Measurement markets.

https://flowtechonline.com
410-666-3200 MD
804-752-3450 VA

Friday, March 30, 2018

Flow-Tech, Inc. - Process Instrumentation, Calibration, Safety, Measurement and Control

Flow-Tech is a manufacturer’s representative and stocking distributor of process instrumentation and calibration equipment in Maryland, D.C and Virginia specializing in the Industrial Process, Control, and Test / Measurement markets. Customers include: Power and Chemical plants, OEM’s, System Integrators, Municipalities, Engineering Firms, Universities, Medical Centers, and Research / Metrology Labs. Products and systems focus on the measurement and control of: flow, pressure, temperature, and level; as well as calibration equipment, analyzers, gas detection, annunciators, and data acquisition. Flow-Tech also provides field service, turn-key systems, equipment start-up, service contracts, and training.


Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Understanding Flow Sensing Technologies

When selecting a flow sensor, flow meter, or flow switch, one of the first considerations is always the process media: air, gas, steam or liquid. Some flow sensing technologies measure gas, some are better at liquids, some are best for a single media, such as steam, and others are good in multiple media. The industry’s major flow sensing technologies now available include:
Thermal
Thermal flow meters.
Depending on the process media and your application’s requirements, all of these technologies have their advantages/ disadvantages. By considering the process media to be measured, as well as your plant’s equipment and layout, environmental conditions, maintenance schedules, energy cost and ROI, you will be able to narrow the field to one or two best choices.

Coriolis
Coriolis
Coriolis (Mass): Coriolis flowmeters use the oscillating movement of two symmetric metal tubes that are made to vibrate from an internal driver coil.  When liquids or gases flow through the tubes, a phase shift occurs (like you see in the hose) and pickups measure the “twist” and then relate that value to the actual flow. In other words, the amount of twist is proportional to the mass flow rate of fluid passing through the tubes. The greater the twist, the larger the distance between, and the greater the flow.

Differential Pressure: The differential flow meter is the most common device for measuring fluid flow through pipes. Flow rates and pressure differential of fluids, such as gases vapors and liquids. The differential flow meter, whether Venturi tube, flow nozzle, or orifice plate style, is an in line instrument that is installed between two pipe flanges and measures the pressure drop across the flow restrictor and equates it to flow.

Magnetic
Magnetic
Electromagnetic: Magnetic flow meters, also called electromagnetic flow meters or "magmeters",operate on a very simple principal. An electrically conductive liquid moving through a magnetic field will generate a voltage that is related to the velocity of the liquid.

Positive Displacement: Provides a direct indication of actual volumetric flow rate. The fluid motion drives the mechanical assembly. As the fluid motion drives the positive displacement flowmeter assembly, its rotational, oscillating, or other regular movement is counted, often by electronic means using magnetic pickups on moving assembly. There are a number of different positive displacement flowmeter designs including oscillating piston, gear, nutating disk, rotary vane, and diaphragm.
Thermal
Thermal

Thermal (Mass): Measure flow by delivering heat into the flowing media and measuring the loss of heat between temperature measurement points. They are popular because they provide unrestricted flow, contain no moving parts, work well on large or small diameter pipes, provide accuracies over a wide range of flow rates, do not require temp/press compensation, and provide mass flow instead of volume.

Turbine
Turbine
Turbine: These types of flowmeters operate under the simple principle that the rotation of the turbine will be constant as the turbine is acted upon by a fluid passing through the flowmeter. The rotational velocity of the turbine is then interpreted as output, allowing for the operator to consistently monitor the flow rate of the process fluid. They are easy to maintain and reliable.
Ultrasonic
Ultrasonic

Ultrasonic: Measure, via sound waves, the velocity of liquid flowing through a pipe.  Doppler shift technology reflects ultrasonic beams off sonically reflective materials. The transit time method exploits the fact that the transmission speed of an ultrasonic signal depends on the flow velocity of the carrier medium. The use of ultrasonic flow technology is most used in the oil, nuclear, wastewater, pharmaceutical, food and beverage industries.
Variable Area
Variable Area

Variable Area: Measures flow rate by allowing the cross-sectional area the fluid travels through to vary, causing a measurable effect. Flow measurement is performed according to the float principle. Used to measure many different types of liquids and gases passing through closed piping.

Vortex Shedding
Vortex
Vortex Shedding: Refers to the phenomenon wherein flowing gas or liquid forms vortices around a solid obstruction placed in the flow path, which can be measured to calculate volumetric or mass flow. Measure the volumetric flow rate of steam, gas, and low viscosity liquids.

Contact Flow-Tech for any industrial or commercial flow application by calling 410-666-3200 in Maryland, or 804-752-3450 in Virginia. Visit https://flowtechonline.com.

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Draeger Gas Detection Transmitter and Feature Selection Charts

Here are two charts to help you select Draeger Gas Detection Transmitters.

The diagram below provides a flow chart on how to properly select a Draeger transmitter.

Draeger Transmitter Selection Flow Chart
Draeger Transmitter Selection Flow Chart (click for larger view).

The table below provides a feature comparison table for most Draeger transmitters (it does not show the PointGard 2100, but the P8100 features are very similar, if not identical).

Draeger transmitter feature comparison table
Draeger transmitter feature comparison table
(click for larger view).

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

The Ideal Flow Monitoring System for a Drinking Water Supply Network

FLEXUS by FLEXIM
The ideal drinking water flow monitoring system.
Wouldn't it be great if you had a closely woven system of measuring points that monitor flow rates in the drinking water supply network as seamlessly as possible and leaks and hydrological problem zones would be detected and corrected as quickly as possible?

Unfortunately the reality looks somewhat different. Installation of conventional flow measuring points in a drinking water supply network incurs high costs and an enormous amount of effort to maintain.

FLEXUS by FLEXIM

FLEXIM is a technology leader in the field of non-invasive flow measurement with clamp-on ultrasonic technology. FLEXUS clamp-on ultrasonic systems measure according to the transit time difference method. Since the transducers are mounted on the outside of the pipe no interventions in the pipeline system are necessary. the drift free and long-term stable acoustic measuring method detects even the smallest flows, even those that lie below the response threshold of conventional flow meters. Therefore, fluxes is the ideal instrument for monitoring minimum flow rates at night, and thus the key to effective consumption and leakage monitoring.

With FLEXUS, a flow measuring point can be conveniently setup within half a working day without supply interruptions with out affecting traffic, and without a heavy lifting device.  For the installation of the ultrasonic measuring system, only temporary access to the pipe has to be created.  The service engineer first checks the pipe dimensions. Sturdy mounting devices made of stainless steel ensure that the flow transducers are permanently stable when installed. Even on the transducers themselves, nothing can break. The cable and sensor are firmly connected. No plug can come loose. Water or dirt cannot penetrate anywhere. The ultrasonic transducers have IP68 protection and can operate continuously underwater. Coupling pads, made of elastic plastic, ensure permanent optimal acoustic coupling to the pipe without any wear. Thanks to their unique internal temperature compensation, FLEXIM transducers do not show any drift during temperature fluctuations. Setup of the measuring point on the pipe is completed by positioning and fixing the ultrasonic transducers. Now only the connection to the measuring transmitter, housed in the switch cabinet, has to be created. The calibration data of carefully paired and calibrated transducers are stored on one chip and are automatically transferred to the measuring transmitter. A zero point calibration on site is not necessary. Where nothing flows, FLEXUS reliably measures zero.

Measurement in Progress

The measuring results are either transmitted by cable or wirelessly via GSM to the process control system. Practical self-diagnosis functions allow for safe evaluation of the measurement quality. Done. Now the measuring point can be refilled underground since the pipe line remained completely intact. There was no need to flush the pipe and no need for the final leak test. In the office, the measured values can be visualized and evaluated on a computer.

Sunday, February 25, 2018

Bently Nevada 3500 Series Machinery Monitoring System Datasheet

Bently Nevada 3500 Series Machinery Monitoring System
Machine condition monitoring combines hardware, software, and service and support – providing a broad, connected view of your operations. Together, they enable your plant to mitigate risk, boost safety, and reduce maintenance costs, while improving equipment reliability, uptime, and efficiency.

Hardware monitoring systems and sensors protect your equipment and collect rich condition monitoring and diagnostic data for analysis. Condition monitoring and diagnostics software connects real-time and historical data from production equipment to help you anticipate failure before it occurs. With scalable deployment and ongoing support service offerings, you can ensure that you’re maximizing the value of your condition monitoring program.

The Bently Nevada 3500 Monitoring System provides continuous, online monitoring suitable for machinery protection and asset condition monitoring applications. It represents our most capable and flexible system in a traditional rack-based design and offers numerous features and advantages not provided in other systems.

Download a PDF version of the Bently Nevada 3500 System datasheet here, or quickly review the embedded document below.

For more information, contact Flow-Tech in Maryland by calling 410-666-3200, in Virginia by calling 804-752-3450, or by visiting https://flowtechonline.com.


Friday, February 16, 2018

Campus Metering: Advantages of Using V-Cone for Measuring Chilled Water & Steam in Hospitals, Universities, and Institutions

McCrometer's V-Cone
Typical diagram of V-Cone installation.
(Click for larger view).
McCrometer's V-Cone® Flow Meter is an advanced differential pressure instrument, which is ideal for use with liquid, steam or gas media in rugged conditions where accuracy, low maintenance and cost are important. The V-Cone is especially useful in tight-fit and retrofit installations. 

In most instances the use of V-Cones associated with chillers for chilled water in large institutional users is a matter of space, accuracy, and turndown. The V-Cone needs very little upstream and downstream piping requirements, allowing it to be used in spaces where other meters cannot be used, or to replace existing flowmeters that never proved accurate because of space limitations. 

In many large universities and other facilities, such as hospitals and airports, across the U.S., the reason for initial interest and subsequent purchases of V-Cones to measure Chilled Water was to fit within the confines of the existing and new buildings that were being used to house the chillers. Additionally, the second most important reason was the delivered accuracy. In the past, most usage had been ignored, but with the rising costs associated with cooling, each individual building must be accountable for individual use. This is just good fiscal responsibility and management from an energy balance standpoint. Turndown was an issue because of seasonal swings in usage based on climate and population in the buildings at any particular time. Therefore, the meters needed to be able to have a large flow span (turndown), which remained accurate during continuous use.
McCrometer's V-Cone
Internal view of V-Cone.

V-Cones have recently been selected for Steam service for mostly the same reasons as they are selected for Chilled Water. Space limitations in new and/or older buildings are a serious concern. V-Cones have the smallest piping requirements of practically any flowmeter and continue to deliver accurate measurement, so they are fiscally responsible and cost effective. Additionally, in steam, they allow condensate and/or other small particulate matter to pass without affecting the measurement, thus giving much better accuracy instantaneously and over time. 

They are very rugged flowmeters which require little or no maintenance, and have a very long expected life even in “tough” service like steam. They can be designed with great turndown (span) and therefore can accommodate changes in flowrates based on demand, seasonal or from other factors.

For more information on V-Cone flowmeters, contact Flow-Tech in Maryland at 410-666-3200, in Virginia at 804-752-3450, or by visiting https://flowtechonline.com.

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

How To Select a Gas Flow Meter for Your Application

Gas Flow Meter

Here is some very good, basic advice, courtesy of FCI (Fluid Components International) on selecting a gas flow meter.

Match your application to the appropriate measurement technology. Accurate flow measurement starts with selecting the best flow meter technology for your application. Every application has a set of requirements that narrows the choice of technologies. For example, thermal dispersion might work best in a dirty process gas, like biogas, because this technology provides no-moving-parts reliability, direct mass flow measurement, and wide range ability. However, positive displacement might be the best technology choice for the custody transfer of natural gas.

An Instrument Specification Sheet is a good place to find information that will help select the most appropriate flow meter technology for an application. This sheet identifies the application's process temperature and pressure, gas composition, piping configuration, accuracy requirements, and more.

Now forward your application information to vendors that offer the most appropriate flow meter technology. Be sure to include as much information about the application as possible and highlight your realistic performance expectations. Do not request 0.5 percent accuracy if the application needs only 5 percent accuracy. Ask these vendors to evaluate your application and provide a product recommendation. Use the information you receive to revise your specification (if necessary), finalize your preferred vendor list, and prepare your request-for-quote.

FCI flowmeters
Contact Flow-Tech for any flow meter application you may have. Our support engineers are ready to help.

In Maryland - 410-666-3200
In Virginia - 804-752-3450
https://flowtechonline.com

Monday, January 29, 2018

Understanding Hydrostatic Pressure in Process Control

Hydrostatic pressure transmitter
Transmitter used to measure
hydrostatic pressure. (Yokogawa)
The pressure exerted by a fluid material in a vessel is directly proportional to its height multiplied by its density.

Hydrostatic pressure, or head pressure, is the force produced by a column of material. As the height of the material changes, there is proportional change in pressure. To calculate hydrostatic pressure, the density of the material is multiplied by the height of the column. The level of fluid in a column can be determined by dividing the pressure value by the density of the material.


To find pressure in a column of water, a gauge placed at the bottom of the vessel. With the water having a density of 0.0361 pounds per cubic inch, the level of the fluid is calculated by dividing the head pressure by the density of the fluid.

An example to determine the level measurement of a column of water that is 2 feet tall in diameter of 0.5 feet is solved by the following steps. The first step is measuring the weight of the vessel. Next measure the weight of the vessel with fluid. The weight of the fluid is determined by subtracting the weight of the vessel from the weight of the vessel with fluid. The volume of the fluid is then derived by dividing the fluid weight by the density of the fluid. The level of the fluid is finally calculated by dividing the volume of the fluid by the surface area.

Hydrostatic pressure can only be calculated from an open container. Within a closed vessel, or pressurized vessel, the vapor space above the column of material adds pressure, and results in inaccurate calculated values. The vessel pressure can be compensated for by using a differential pressure transmitter. This device has a high pressure side input and a low pressure side input. The high-pressure input is connected to the bottom of the tank to measure hydrostatic pressure. The low-pressure input of the differential pressure transducer is connected to the vapor space pressure. The transducer subtracts the vapor pressure from the high-pressure. Resulting is a value that represents the hydrostatic head proportional to the liquid level.

Saturday, January 20, 2018

Tank Overfill Protection

Tank Level Control
Tank Level Control Diagram (Yokogawa)
Protecting against tank overfill allows for process control industry professionals to mitigate potential risk to both their processes and process materials. Different products present different risks regarding tank overfill, but the work of preventing overfill is a universal component of safety, procedural effectiveness, and maximization of resources. If tank overfill does occur, a number of potential negative outcomes could result, especially in the cases of wastewater, chemicals, and petroleum products. Everyone, from management to methodology, needs to be working from the same ideal regarding safety as an inherent priority of process control.

Instead of solely focusing on tank overfill prevention, many corporations have developed written instructions for every individual operator in an organization. Not only do these standards adhere to regulations, but they also meet environmental standards while eliminating accident risk. Six Sigma is an example of data-driven management meant to eliminate potential defects in safety procedures. The idea of pursuing perfection in all components of an organization may originally seem far away from overfill protection. However, previous attempts to confront tank overfill without consideration for the larger organization narrowed operational windows to only consider one part of the system.

Expanding this system to include root causes of overfill prevention instead of solely the mechanisms for prevention has resulted in a more holistic approach to the integration of safety standards. Regulatory requirements for tank metrics, how to operate aboveground versus below ground tanks, and process material specific guidelines are combined with internal company codes. Those two elements are then fused with the Recognized and Generally Accepted Good Engineering Practices which are developed by industry associations. The tri-part approach has resulted in a more collaborative effort to combat tank overfill problems.

One metric employed to prevent tank overfill-related dangers is to measure whether or not the tank in question has the appropriate room to accommodate abnormal process behavior. Considerations such as these mesh with evaluations of pipe size and whether or tanks need to be connected to relief tanks. Assessment of both operational and insurance risk means the entirety of the process must be understood and evaluated so that the interaction between the process materials can be predicted and then mitigated. Whether these components are raw materials, system components, or final products in the latter stages of the process, automated systems combined with operator diligence based on established methodology is the best way to prevent overfill and associated dangers.

To discuss your tank level control and overfill requirements, contact Flow-Tech at https://www.flowtechonline.com or call 410-666-3200 in Maryland, or 804-752-3450 in Virginia.

Saturday, January 13, 2018

How to Adjust Alarms and Pointer for Brooks Instrument Models MT3809G & MT3810G Variable Area Flowmeters

Here are the instructions for the removal and reinstallation of the XP housing indicator cover, and
how to adjust alarms and pointers for Brooks Instrument models MT3809G & MT3810G variable area flowmeters:

Warning: If it becomes necessary to service or remove the instrument from the system, power to the device is disconnected at the power supply.
  1. To begin make sure the float is at rest and there isn’t flow going through the meter.
  2. Using your hands or a strap wrench turn the cover counter clockwise to remove the cover from the housing.
  3. Remove the cover from the housing. The gasket should stay attached to the groove in the housing.
  4. Using a flat blade screwdriver with a 1/8" blade, hold the red alarm pointer and turn the screw counterclockwise to loosen the pointer, slide it to desired position on scale and tighten screw.
  5. Using a flat blade screwdriver with a 1/8" blade, hold the pointer and turn the screw to align with the “R” on the scale. It may take a few adjustments to get the pointer aligned to the “R”.
  6. To replace the cover, place the cover against the housing and turn the cover clockwise. Note, it will take several rotations to tighten the cover and the cover must be in contact with the gasket to keep a watertight seal.

MT3809G & MT3810G variable area flowmeter
Click for larger view.
For additional assistance, contact Flow-Tech in Maryland at 410-666-3200 or Virginia at 804-752-3450 or visit https://flowtechonline.com.