Showing posts with label Brooks Instrument. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Brooks Instrument. Show all posts

Saturday, January 13, 2018

How to Adjust Alarms and Pointer for Brooks Instrument Models MT3809G & MT3810G Variable Area Flowmeters

Here are the instructions for the removal and reinstallation of the XP housing indicator cover, and
how to adjust alarms and pointers for Brooks Instrument models MT3809G & MT3810G variable area flowmeters:

Warning: If it becomes necessary to service or remove the instrument from the system, power to the device is disconnected at the power supply.
  1. To begin make sure the float is at rest and there isn’t flow going through the meter.
  2. Using your hands or a strap wrench turn the cover counter clockwise to remove the cover from the housing.
  3. Remove the cover from the housing. The gasket should stay attached to the groove in the housing.
  4. Using a flat blade screwdriver with a 1/8" blade, hold the red alarm pointer and turn the screw counterclockwise to loosen the pointer, slide it to desired position on scale and tighten screw.
  5. Using a flat blade screwdriver with a 1/8" blade, hold the pointer and turn the screw to align with the “R” on the scale. It may take a few adjustments to get the pointer aligned to the “R”.
  6. To replace the cover, place the cover against the housing and turn the cover clockwise. Note, it will take several rotations to tighten the cover and the cover must be in contact with the gasket to keep a watertight seal.

MT3809G & MT3810G variable area flowmeter
Click for larger view.
For additional assistance, contact Flow-Tech in Maryland at 410-666-3200 or Virginia at 804-752-3450 or visit https://flowtechonline.com.

Monday, November 20, 2017

Understanding Mass Flow Controller (MFC) Metrology & Calibration

Mass flow controllers (MFCs) precisely deliver fluids, mainly process gases, into bioreactors and other process systems. The stable, reliable and repeatable delivery of these gases is a function of four key factors:
  • The quality and sophistication of the MFC’s design.
  • The application set-up, which covers the acceptable level of  fluid delivery accuracy a given process requires.
  • Metrology: what specific techniques are used to test, measure and con rm MFC accuracy.
  • Calibration checks: how an MFC is calibrated on an ongoing basis.
It’s common to extensively investigate an MFC’s technical characteristics and capabilities, as well as analyze and ensure that the MFC technology chosen fully satis es each operation’s unique process requirements. Equally important is the role that metrology, which includes testing reference standards and calibration practices, plays in the performance and long-term value of biopharmaceutical process equipment MFCs. In the eBook below, we will provide a deeper understanding of metrology’s role in how MFCs are used and managed in these systems. This includes:
  • The key elements of MFC accuracy and why calibration is important
  • How MFC calibration reference standards are used and why selecting the right standard matters
  • The role that “uncertainty” plays in calibrating MFCs
  • Factors that can lead to improper calibration
Please review the eBook embedded in this post below, or if you prefer, you can download your own PDF copy here - Understanding Mass Flow Controller (MFC) Metrology & Calibration. For more information about MFC's, contact Flow-Tech at https://www.flowtechonline.com or call 410-666-3200.

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Writing LabVIEW™ Programs for Brooks® Mass Flow Controllers (MFCs)

Brooks Instrument has been innovating thermal mass flow technology for decades, continually launching new products and enhancing existing systems to unlock new levels of thermal mass flow precision, responsiveness, accuracy and repeatability.

LabVIEW™ is systems engineering software for applications that require test, measurement, and control with rapid access to hardware and data insights. LabVIEW simplifies hardware integration so that you can rapidly acquire and visualize data sets from virtually any I/O device, whether by NI or a third-party.

Brooks® MFCs are known for:
  • Industry-best range of products to meet widest application needs
  • Innovative MultiFlo™ technology lets one device change gas types and ranges without removing the device from the system and improving actual process gas accuracy
  • Complete product range includes both elastomer sealed and metal sealed options
  • Ultra-high purity devices engineered to satisfy thin film, semiconductor and other high-tech industry requirements.
The video below provides step-by-step instructions on writing a LabVIEW™ program for Brooks Instrument MFC's.

For more information, visit http://www.Flowtechonline.com/Brooks. In Maryland call 410-666-3200. In Virginia call 804-752-3450.

Saturday, May 13, 2017

Basics of Variable Area Flowmeters

Variable area flowmeters (rotameters) are engineered to provide years of repeatable, reliable measurement of gas and liquid flow rates.

Features

  • Reliable, easy-to-read displays
  • Fail-safe flow indication under any circumstance
  • Integral flow controller to compensate for varying pressures
  • Materials and designs to suit multiple pressure ranges
  • Field-replaceable components and custom scales
  • Integration of optional flow switches, automated valves or alarms

Applications

  • Basic liquid or gas flow measurement
  • Rotating equipment flow measurement
  • Process analyzers
  • High-pressure flow on offshore oil platforms
  • Chemical injection
  • Purge liquid or gas metering

Watch the video below for a full understanding of variable area flowmeters. For more information, contact Flow-Tech in Maryland at 410-666-3200 or in Virginia at 804-752-3450.

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Mass Flow Controller White-paper: A New Class of MFCs with Embedded Flow Diagnostics

Brooks G40
Mass Flow Controller
(courtesy of Brooks Instrument)
A white-paper by Brooks Instrument outlining recent trends in multi-sensor measurements within a mass flow controller are reviewed, with a focus on controller self-diagnostics.

For more information in Maryland or Virginia, visit www.flowtechonline.com or call 410-666-3200 (MD) or 804-752-3450 (VA).

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Connecting Brooks Instrument Thermal Mass Flow Controllers with LabVIEW™

Brooks MFC
Brooks MFC
LabVIEWBrooks Instrument manufactures mass flow controllers with a well earned reputation for accuracy and reliability. LabVIEW™’s integrated development environment for building measurement and control systems is used in laboratory, university, and pilot manufacturing plants around the world. Together, Brooks MFCs and LabVIEW make a great combination for measuring and controlling mass flow, as well as for for data acquisition. Below are some typical communications scenarios used between Brooks MFCs and the LabVIEW™control platform.

Analog Signal Interface

In many situations LabVIEW™ software users also use analog to digital
I/O cards. With analog input cards, users can run their mass flow controllers utilizing a standard 0-5 volt or 4-20 mA analog signaling via LabVIEW™. This is a time-tested, traditional approach and is recommended for applications without the availability of digital control systems.

RS485 Digital Interface

Brooks Instrument mass flow devices configured with RS485 communications (must have the ‘S’ communications option) provide RS485 digital communications via a 15-pin D connector. The RS485 digital signal is passed directly to a computer running LabVIEW™ through a serial RS485 converter. Brooks models GF40, GF80 and SLA Series mass flow controllers are available with the ‘S’ communications option.

Its valuable to note that there is also a free set of VI file for use with LabVIEW from Brooks. These can be loaded directly into the LabVIEW™ application and provide the basics required to create a LabVIEW control interface using the S-Protocol digital command structure. The VI files are available for download from the Brooks Instrument website.

Another communications alternative is using Brook’s Smart DDE (Dynamic Data Exchange) software tool to create links between the LabVIEW™ application and the GF40, GF80 or SLA Series flow, control, and configuration parameters. Additionally, the user can leverage Windows applications (Excel, Word, Access) and programming languages ( C++, C#, Visual Basic) and SCADA programs from suppliers such as Allesco and Millennium Systems International. No knowledge of the mass flow device S-Protocol command structure is required. With Smart DDE, the user gets direct access to the required data fields. While not a complete turnkey option, it greatly reduces the amount of code required to communicate between LabVIEW and the mass flow controller.

DeviceNet Digital Signal Interface

Brooks models GF40, GF80 and SLA, configured for DeviceNet digital communications, can also be controlled via the LabVIEW™ application provided a National Instruments DeviceNet interface card, associated drivers, and software are used. These additional items support the development of application interfaces using LabVIEW™ software for Windows and LabVIEW™ Real-Time.

According to the National Instruments website:

National Instruments DeviceNet for Control interfaces are for applications that manage and control other DeviceNet devices on the network. These interfaces, offered in one-port versions for PCI and PXI, provide full master (scanner) functionality to DeviceNet networks. All NI DeviceNet interfaces include the NI-Industrial Communications for DeviceNet driver software, which features easy access to device data and streamlined explicit messaging. Use a real-time controller such as PXI and NI industrial controllers to create deterministic control applications with the NI LabVIEW Real-Time Module.

As always, discussing the best communication protocol for your application with an authorized applications expert is highly recommended. For more information on mass flow controllers with analog or digital communications contact:

Flow-Tech, Inc.
MD: 410-666-3200
VA: 804-752-3450
www.flowtechonline.com

Monday, June 20, 2016

Setting Up RS485 Communication Networks for Multiple Brooks Mass Flow Controllers


Brooks Instrument is a well known manufacturer of mass flow controllers & meters, variable area flow meters (rotameters), pressure & vacuum products, and vaporization products. Their products are found worldwide and in many industrial and R&D applications.  Many times multiple Brooks instruments are used on the same piece of equipment of control loop. Fo installation where multiple MFC's, pressure controllers, or meters are used, Brooks offers supplemental software and hardware to easily network the devices together. The following post provides instruction on setting up a RS485 communication network of Brooks devices.

The three main components required are:

  • The Brooks controller (MFC, pressure controller, etc ..)
  • Brooks Smart Interface software
  • Brooks Model 0260 power supply and converter


For networks with fewer than 10 Brooks devices:

For this part of the discussion, we'll call a small network one with 10 or fewer Brooks controllers. Setting up this type of network is easy - simply daisy-chain the devices and connect to the Model 0260. Then, connect the 0260 via USB to your computer or laptop. Example below:



For networks with 10 to 30 Brooks devices:

For a larger network of 10 devices or greater, the Brook 0260 powered converter should also be selected for best performance results. The 0260 power supply/converter from Brooks Instrument along with the Smart interface software can control up to 30 devices. Both of these products will communicate with any Brooks Instrument MFC or electronic pressure controller with the RS485 Smart Protocol, such as the GF40, GF80 and SLA5800 Series. Other than the 0260 power supply, the only piece of hardware required to set up the network is a multi-drop cable. The images below show different ways to set-up a network with more than 10 devices.

The Brooks Smart Interface software and hardware will work independently. For users that have their own software tools, the 0260 hardware can be used as a power source and signal converter. Additionally, the Brooks Smart Interface software can be used in conjunction with hardware already in place.

For more information on any Brooks Instrument product in Maryland or Virginia, contact:

Flow-Tech, Inc.
www.flowtechonline.com

Maryland Headquarters
10940 Beaver Dam Rd
Hunt Valley, MD 21030
Ph: 410-666-3200

Central VA Office
10993 Richardson Rd#13
Ashland, VA 23005
Ph: 804-752-3450

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Capacitance Manometers for Use in Lyophilization (Freeze-drying) Processes


Introduction

Lyophilization, also known as cryodesiccation, or more commonly “freeze-drying” is a dehydration process typically used to preserve a perishable material or make the material more convenient for transport. The freeze-drying process works by exposing a material that has been frozen to a vacuum environment. This lowers the vapor pressure of the frozen water contained in the material. Heat will be applied to the environment, driving the water out of the material through the process of sublimation.

In order to avoid the liquid phase of the frozen water, it is absolutely essential to lower the partial pressure of water, below the triple point pressure. The triple point is the point where 3 phases - liquid, solid, and vapor - coexist at a particular temperature and pressure. As the water vapor exits the sample, a chilled surface known as the ice condenser collects the vapor from the evolving product capturing it and preventing reabsorption or saturation of the chamber environment.

Applications

BioPharm manufacturing: Uses lyophilization to preserve products such as vaccines and other injectable drugs (parenterals). The removal of water from these materials allows for the preservation, shipping, and storage of smaller volumes of material. Tablets or wafers are also freeze dried often creating dosage forms which are more rapidly absorbed or more easily administered. Proteins, enzymes, microorganisms, and blood plasma are also examples of materials that are commonly lyophilized. In bioseparation processes, lyophilization is also used as a method to remove solvents that may be too costly or too difficult to remove by other means. FDA requires a higher temperature process manometer to be used in conjunction with a pirani gauge to understand when the “drying” is complete.

Food manufacturing: “Freeze-dried” foods help food manufacturers increase product shelf life and allows them to cater to the needs of consumers who are interested in convenience. The foods are typically easier to store and transport due to the removal of water and its associated weight. Foods last longer and can be used in environments outside the norm (e.g. wilderness, military situations, etc.) Common examples are coffee, fruits, and cereals.

Process Details

Once a material has been frozen, the environment in which the material lies is placed under partial vacuum, usually a few millibars. Heat is introduced forcing the frozen water to sublimate thereby exiting the material. That water vapor is often captured on a condensing coil and preventing it from re-entering the freeze dried material. It is important to note that the use of a heated capacitance manometer will prevent the unit from acting as a condenser of the water vapor.

In the final step of the process, the vacuum in the chamber is relieved by introducing an inert gas such as nitrogen. This gas regulation may be an area where Brooks Instrument variable area flow meters (rotameters) or MFCs could be supplied. “Downstream” packaging of freeze dried materials often involves “vacuum packaging” which attempts the complete removal of oxygen from the final packaged material. This is important because oxygen is the primary factor in product spoilage. Vacuum packaging may also present opportunities to sell CMX capacitance manometers.

Brooks Instrument Solutions - CMX – XacTorr Capacitance Manometer
XacTorr Capacitance Manometer
XacTorr Capacitance Manometer
  • Vacuum measurement instrument
  • Full scale ranges: 100mT to 1,000Torr
  • Gas independent technology, digital and not impacted by the water vapor
  • Digital zeroing at the unit or remotely – ability to predict remaining zero life
  • 64 Point calibration: ±0.15% of reading (0.25% <1Torr range)
  • Optimum configurations for all process
    • i. 160C 1 Torr is the typical configuration for freeze drying
  • Contamination resistant sensor: Longer life, lower cost of ownership. 3x larger internal sensor volume versus competitive
  • Industry standard 9-pin or 15-pin analog or DeviceNet interfaces
  • Available with common tri-clamp and industry standard fittings
  • Unique independent diagnostic and service port
For more information contact:

Flow-Tech, Inc.
10940 Beaver Dam Rd
Hunt Valley, MD 21030
Ph: 410-666-3200

Central VA Office
10993 Richardson Rd#13
Ashland, VA 23005
Ph: 804-752-3450

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Liquid Vaporizer Systems

Direct liquid injection vaporizer
DLI courtesy of Brooks Instrument
Direct liquid injection vaporizer technology overcomes the many limitations of conventional vaporizing technologies. Bubblers, or vapor draw systems, are difficult to start and stop, require very close control of temperature and pressure, and are inefficient at generating well controlled vapor mass flow. Vaporizing valves, hot frit, heat tracing, and other "flash vaporizers" that apply heat to the liquid using a hot metal surface are also inefficient at generating vapor mass and frequently can cause thermal decomposition of the liquid precursor. None of these conventional technologies can eliminate the potential for liquid carry-over and its attendant problems.

For, in-depth more information check out the document below.