Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Well Grounded Knowledge for Industrial Control - Part Three of Three

Drawing symbol for electrical ground connection
Drawing Symbol for Electrical Ground Connection

This is the third part of a three part series of white papers intended to boost or reinforce your knowledge of electrical grounding for industrial process measurement and control.

Part One and Part Two were previously posted in this blog and you would be best served to read all three papers in sequence.

The series was exceptionally well written by the folks at Acromag, a world class manufacturer of industrial I/O devices.

Your questions or concerns about any aspect of your industrial process control or measurement applications are always welcome. Contact us and we will work with you to formulate a solution to a process measurement and control challenge.


Well Grounded Knowledge for Industrial Control - Part Two of Three

Electrical drawing symbol for ground connection
Drawing Symbol for Electrical Ground Connection
The use of electric power to perform work, whether using large motors or sensitive instrumentation, involves benefits and hazards. In modern society, preventing exposure of equipment and appliance users to electric shock is universally accepted as a mandate imposed upon manufacturers, installers, and operators of electrical equipment. Proper electrical grounding serves as a key element in maintaining the level of safe operation we all want to have in our facilities.

One manufacturer of industrial process control I/O devices, Acromag, has expertly written three white papers in a series providing non-technical tutorials and explanations on the subject of electrical grounding and its integral role in safety and operational integrity.
Some topics covered include:
  • The safety function of a ground connection
  • Operation of a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI)
  • How electrical ground can stabilize voltage and limit transients
  • Recommendations for improvement of safety and signal integrity   
  • Importance of circuit grounding
  • AC power in the United States and its use of earth ground
Part One was published previously, and it is advisable to review the three parts in sequence. The third installment follows this post. This is recommended reading for all technical levels. Industrial process measurement and control stakeholders will all benefit, whether from newly acquired knowledge or refreshed understanding of the subject.

Product and application specialists are always eager to hear about your application issues and questions. Never hesitate to contact them. Your process knowledge, combined with the product and application familiarity of a professional sales engineer, will generate good outcomes.


Well Grounded Knowledge for Industrial Control - Part One of Three

Drawing symbol for electrical ground connection
Drawing Symbol for Electrical Ground
I suspect that most control system techs have, at one time or another, come face to face with control or instrument behavior that seemed bizarre and intractable. Maybe strange behavior would come and go with no apparent explanation. Instruments or control equipment would work properly for a while, then inexplicably go south. You carefully observe illogical operation occurring without any apparent cause, and sorting it out proves to be very difficult. This is not a situation in which you want to find yourself as a service technician, operator, or vendor, particularly when process stakeholders, like your boss or customer, are observing your progress.

While many of these stories may illicit laughter when retold as history, at the time they are serious business and nobody is laughing. If you want to avoid these sweat stain inducng situations in your career, one subject on which you should be well versed is electrical grounding of your industrial process equipment and instruments. Whether a tech, vendor, or operator, solid basic knowledge about grounding principals and techniques will help you to assure the safety of personnel and equipment in your work area and keep instrumentation and controls operating as intended.

This first of three installments is shown below, expertly written by the engineers at Acromag, a world class manufacturer of I/O devices for industrial process measurement and control.  Part Two and Part Three will be published in successive posts. I recommend these white papers for all technical levels as newly acquired knowledge or refresher. This is subject matter that applies universally. Be sure to read Part Two and Part Three.

Application assistance is always available from knowledgeable sales engineers specializing in process measurement and control. The best solution to an application challenge will arise from a combination of your process mastery and the product knowledge and technical resources of your respected vendors.



Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Liquid Vaporizer Systems

Direct liquid injection vaporizer
DLI courtesy of Brooks Instrument
Direct liquid injection vaporizer technology overcomes the many limitations of conventional vaporizing technologies. Bubblers, or vapor draw systems, are difficult to start and stop, require very close control of temperature and pressure, and are inefficient at generating well controlled vapor mass flow. Vaporizing valves, hot frit, heat tracing, and other "flash vaporizers" that apply heat to the liquid using a hot metal surface are also inefficient at generating vapor mass and frequently can cause thermal decomposition of the liquid precursor. None of these conventional technologies can eliminate the potential for liquid carry-over and its attendant problems.

For, in-depth more information check out the document below.